Rare metals mining company plans to build processing plant in Ketchikan

first_imgEnergy & Mining | SoutheastRare metals mining company plans to build processing plant in KetchikanFebruary 1, 2018 by Leila Kheiry, KRBD Share:The peak of Bokan Mountain on Prince of Wales Island. Ucore Rare Metals Inc. has been exploring the Bokan-Dotson Ridge site as a possible new mine. (Photo courtesy Ucore Rare Metals)A sign marks a trail up Bokan Mountain on Prince of Wales Island. Ucore Rare Metals Inc. has been exploring the Bokan-Dotson Ridge site as a possible new mine. (Photo courtesy Ucore Rare Metals)12

The peak of Bokan Mountain on Prince of Wales Island.A sign marks a trail up Bokan Mountain on Prince of Wales Island.

A Canadian mining company that specializes in rare earth mineral extraction announced Tuesday it plans to build a processing facility in Ketchikan.Ucore Rare Metals, Inc., based in Nova Scotia, has been exploring the Bokan-Dotson Ridge site on Prince of Wales Island as a possible new mine.That potential mine is not anywhere near production yet , but Mike Schrider, vice president of operations and engineering, said the plant will be built whether or not the mine is developed.“We would actually initially process feedstocks from other sites throughout the world, get the processing plant up and running and established, and eventually, when the timing is right with the market, we would ultimately try to get Bokan on line and then also process the Bokan ore concentrate at this particular facility,” he said.Schrider said a specific site for the processing plant has not been chosen. The first step was deciding on Ketchikan as the right location.“We looked at a variety of factors, including the proximity to Bokan mine, the existing relationship we have with AIDEA, the access to international shipping corridors, the available workforce in Ketchikan,” he said. “So it’s a good fit for us and we felt it would also be a good fit for Ketchikan.”AIDEA is the Alaska Industrial Development and Export Authority. That state agency provides financial assistance for economic development projects. The Legislature in 2014 approved an AIDEA financing package of $145 million to develop Bokan mine and related processing facilities.The prices for rare earth elements dropped a few years ago.  Schrider said work at the mine is on hold.“We’re waiting for signs of recovery in that particular sector,” he said. “Once we see those signs, that will lead us to the next step in that project.”Schrider said there is not yet a timeline for development of the processing plant.“Now that we made the determination to locate the plant in Ketchikan, we need to go through our next phase of due diligence, which will yield a detailed plan for us, and then we’ll come out with what our anticipated schedule is,” he said.Schrider said the plant, once built, will initially employ about a dozen people. Eventually, he said, it will employ about 30.Rare earth elements are used in high-tech products such as cellular telephones and electric vehicles. Most of the rare earth elements in the market come from China.Share this story:last_img read more

British people’s confidence in the economy has soared in the last two and a half years

first_img whatsapp Sarah Spickernell Wednesday 5 August 2015 4:24 pm by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeMoneyPailShe Was A Star, Now She Works In ScottsdaleMoneyPailSwift VerdictChrissy Metz, 39, Shows Off Massive Weight Loss In Fierce New PhotoSwift VerdictMaternity WeekA Letter From The Devil Written By A Possessed Nun In 1676 Has Been TranslatedMaternity WeekPost FunKate & Meghan Are Very Different Mothers, These Photos Prove ItPost FunComedyAbandoned Submarines Floating Around the WorldComedyGameday NewsNBA Wife Turns Heads Wherever She GoesGameday Newszenherald.comMeghan Markle Changed This Major Detail On Archies Birth Certificatezenherald.comEquity MirrorThey Drained Niagara Falls — They Weren’t Prepared For This Sickening DiscoveryEquity MirrorTheFashionBallAlica Schmidt Is The Most Beautiful Athlete To ExistTheFashionBall British people’s confidence in their economy is currently at its highest in five years, according to a global poll by Ipsos Mori.  Read more: Surveys reveal UK consumers are optimistic on the economy Half of UK respondents in the July survey said they thought their economy was in good health – up from just 13 per cent two and a half years ago. This is a bigger rise in confidence than in the US, where there was an increase from 31 per cent to 43 per cent over the same time period. The UK also now has higher confidence in its economy than the average of 40 per cent across the 24 countries surveyed in the report, which was seen by The Guardian. It is faring particularly well against most of its European neighbours – in both France and Italy just 10 per cent of people say they have faith in their economies. Germany, on the other hand, has a massive 78 per cent confidence level among its people. Huge variation between Bric countriesAt the top end of the Bric spectrum is India, where 82 per cent of people think the economy is on a good track. Falling slightly behind comes China, with 72 per cent feeling that way. There is then a big drop down to the 37 per cent confidence reported by Russia. That said, it could have been a lot lower considering the oil price crisis and economic sanctions imposed because of its activities in Ukraine.  But at the very bottom of the Bric list comes Brazil, where no more than 12 per cent have faith in their economy. This is a huge fall from 57 per cent confidence three years ago, reflecting almost the exact reverse of what has happened in the UK.  Of all the countries looked at, Saudi Arabia came out on top with 91 per cent of its population reporting economic confidence. Overall improvement in the last five yearsWhile some countries have risen and others have fallen in confidence, the general change has been a positive one. Around the world, 40 per cent of people say they think their national economy is in a good state, which is higher than any time over the last five years.  Sentiment hit rock bottom in November 2012, when just 25 per cent of people in the countries surveyed reported feeling this way.   whatsapp Tags: NULL Show Comments ▼ British people’s confidence in the economy has soared in the last two and a half years Sharelast_img read more

Lawmakers urge Trump administration to enact price-gouging penalty

first_img Lawmakers urge Trump administration to enact price-gouging penalty @Pharmalot More than a dozen U.S. senators have asked the Trump administration to proceed “as soon as possible” with a rule that would punish drug makers for overcharging hospitals, clinics, and other providers for medicines purchased under the federal government’s 340B drug discount program.The request comes after the Trump administration recently delayed implementation until July 2018, a move that followed previous delays and prompted fresh criticism that the White House was kowtowing to the pharmaceutical industry. Andrew Harnik/AP By Ed Silverman Oct. 30, 2017 Reprints Ed Silverman [email protected] What is it? Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED What’s included?center_img Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Pharmalot About the Author Reprints STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. Log In | Learn More GET STARTED Tags Donald Trumpdrug pricinghospitalspharmaceuticalspolicySTAT+last_img read more

Long miles, lonely roads: In rural Texas, dying at home means little is easy

first_img Photos by Justin Rex for STAT Newsletters Sign up for Daily Recap A roundup of STAT’s top stories of the day. Please enter a valid email address. Hospice nurse Laura Brown checks Shawn Jordan’s heart in his mother’s house, in Haskell County, Texas. Please enter a valid email address. “I wanted to see everybody one last time, if I was going to pass away,” Jordan said about the moment he decided to go into hospice. “It was going to be in a familiar environment, in my environment. This was going to be a lot more comfortable.” Related: Brown works for Hendrick Hospice Care, affiliated with Hendrick Medical Center in Abilene. After seeing patients at the hospice facility in the city, she talked to Jordan by phone, grabbed supplies, including a colostomy bag, and got on the road.Brown gets supplies from Hendrick Hospice Care in Abilene, before heading out to see patients. As with many hospice nurses, her car is her office — a fuel-efficient, white four-door with a blue cooler for lunch and snacks, and plenty of space for supplies. On the roughly 50-minute drive to Jordan’s house, she took a phone call about another patient who needed help with medications. Such multitasking, she said, is fairly common.Hendrick serves people in 13 counties in a 65-mile radius from Abilene. The standard across the state, according to industry officials, is to be able to get to patients in about an hour.For their home cases, nurses see about four people per shift, said Hendrick director Karen Tucek. They are dispatched in a “spokes on a wheel” formation, moving in one direction and stopping along the way before heading back — Brown started her day 25 miles south of Abilene, then wended her way 50-plus miles north. Jodi Fry, another nurse working that day, headed east from Abilene, seeing patients in a loop that easily reached 100 miles.The roads get rough fast outside small cities like Abilene, and help, while a phone call away, may take a long time to get there.Tucek, like other providers, told stories of nurses and aides getting stuck on the road and needing a vehicle with four-wheel drive to dislodge them. She spoke of run-ins with deer. Nancy Kernell, a nurse and the owner of Area Community Hospice in Plainview, described night runs on dark Panhandle roads.“You drive down roads, you might hit a wild hog, it’s so dark,” she said. “Some people will flicker their lights out in the country so we can find them.” HealthLong miles, lonely roads: In rural Texas, dying at home means little is easy Leave this field empty if you’re human: Since the accident in 2013, he’s had to deal with open wounds that won’t heal, and antibiotic-resistant bacteria that repeatedly find their way inside him. He’d lost weight, and he needed a colostomy bag that would stick well to fragile skin.But what Brown brought wouldn’t do, and after some quick internet sleuthing, she left. First, she hit a pharmacy in town — it didn’t have the right style. Then, she went to a nursing home nearby. A little begging, a little borrowing, she recalled later, and she got the bag.She was back at Jordan’s in under an hour, but the whole trip took more than two hours, not to mention her next stops, and the drive home. She spoke highly of Jordan, and his will to live — and accept death — without regrets. One of his wounds has since started draining fluid — a fearful sign, he said this week, that the eighth infection might be underway.“He’s trying to take care of himself,” Brown said. “He’s probably outlived people who have had the same thing happen to them.”And Jordan is equally respectful of the nurses who come to see him.“You don’t realize you get that attached, but you do,” he said of the nurse who treated him most often in 2017. “As far as I’m concerned, she’s family.”Hospice nurses are often referred to as angels, because of when they enter people’s lives and the work that they do. But Brown bristled at the idea that she was an angel. Her work, she said, is a privilege.“You just get to be there, to hold their hand, and to love them,” she said, before a long pause. “I’m not really sure what an angel is supposed to feel like.” HASKELL COUNTY, Texas — To get to the house where Shawn Jordan wants to die, you drive a hypnotic road along miles of furrowed cotton fields, gnarly mesquite trees, low-to-the-ground cactus, and cattle perpetually in search of food.This iconic land of open spaces and oil pumps, where the Panhandle meets west Texas, is where the 43-year-old came home after a car accident he said should have killed him. He’s since had his paralyzed legs amputated, and survived seven MRSA infections.He’s been in hospice care since that last infection, because he knows the eighth could be his last. And he wants to spend his remaining time here, with family, surrounded by the rocking horse and toys of his toddler grandson, as well as emblems of the working west — antique spurs and ranch hooks on the wall, tin stars, and a saddle in a corner by the door. It’s his country. It’s home.advertisement Shawn Jordan Most hospices fare well in first public release of Medicare quality scores Reimagining hospice care — for the living Related: Privacy Policy “I wanted to see everybody one last time, if I was going to pass away. It was going to be in a familiar environment, in my environment. ” Kassner said missed calls and appointments, especially at the very end of life, should prompt a discussion of how hospice providers are paid by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Medicare is the primary payment vehicle for hospice services and agencies are paid a day rate for patients, even if, as the Kaiser story showed, no one comes to the house. Kassner suggested that a two-tier system might work better, where on top of the flat rate, hospices would get paid extra for visits in those last few days.He and others also said that while not excusing outright neglect, the burden falls on providers that serve rural patients to set expectations as early on in the process as possible.“In rural areas, it’s a completely different setup,” Kassner said.Hendrick Hospice nurse Jodi Fry heads east from Abilene to see her first patient in Clyde, Texas. Hospice managers send staff to home visits in a “spokes on a wheel” fashion to minimize travel time. The search for the right colostomy bagBrown had to navigate from memory to find the gravel road that led to Jordan’s house; her GPS struggled with the address. Dodging toys and a new litter of kittens lounging in the shade of the front porch, she knocked on Jordan’s door. There was no answer. She called. Again, no answer.Concerned, she tried the door. It opened, and after a couple of tense minutes, she found Jordan in his bedroom, where he was trying to dress himself for the visit. Eventually, he wheeled into the living room, and the two began to talk.His eyes darted around the room, as he sipped watermelon lemonade and frequently shifted in his wheelchair. Occasionally, he’d make a joke. “At some point today, I’ll have to go get a Dr Pepper, because it’s the nectar of life,” he said, laughing hoarsely about the unofficial state beverage.Jordan shares his home with his mother, his son, his grandson, and his daughter-in-law, who, as his main caretaker, has had to learn things like how to correctly pick him up. His two other children live out of state. They were in the car with him when it flipped over a guardrail a few miles from his home. Newsletters Sign up for Morning Rounds Your daily dose of news in health and medicine. “We want the expectation to be set up front,” said Gina Councilman, executive director of Hospice of San Angelo, which serves 15 counties in west Texas that covers an area bigger than Massachusetts and Connecticut combined. “We’ll talk on the phone, but it will be a lag to get out there.”On a recent afternoon, a routine nursing visit to check on Jordan seemed straightforward — he needed a new colostomy bag. It turned out to be anything but.The once-paved road that leads to the house where Jordan lives in Haskell County, Texas, is flanked with mesquite, cotton, and wild grasses. A shortage of nurses, an excess of milesIt’s not easy to find people who will do hospice nursing in this part of Texas. The hours are irregular, and nurses are often on-call. A 250-mile day isn’t unheard of.For registered nurse Laura Brown, it’s what you have to do to care for sick people. Before joining hospice, she was an infusion nurse, giving cancer patients chemotherapy. She was used to patients dying as much as living.“I go wherever they send me,” she said, listing off small towns that rise up after miles of open land, just to disappear a minute later in a rearview mirror.Brown had not seen Jordan in a while — his regular nurse was on vacation, and she was filling in. He would be her second stop on a day that eventually covered 220 miles from home to patients and back again. Jordan’s wish is not unusual — most people who enter hospice want to die at home, even if they often don’t. But in rural Texas, where rugged individualism defines both the relationship to the land and the hesitation to ask for outside help, many don’t sign up for hospice until their very last days. And when they do, the long distances and often empty miles mean long hours for nurses, arduous trips to the hospital, and extra work for caregivers who have to learn basic medical care.Hospice providers in the more remote western and southern parts of the state shared stories with STAT of nursing shortages, scheduling gymnastics, run-ins with wildlife, and the wear and tear of long days in cars for the men and women who treat people at home. Distance sometimes forces hard conversations: At the moment they and their caregivers need help most, a nurse may not quickly be at their side.advertisement By Megha Satyanarayana March 15, 2018 Reprints Privacy Policy Leave this field empty if you’re human: Kernell said she’s been looking for a nurse for two months, and there are times when her hospice is short-staffed. When that happens, she adds herself to the call schedule.“We don’t ever go down on care because of nurses,” she said. “We just work longer hours.”Councilman, of Hospice of San Angelo, said to better cover her sprawling service area, she tries to find nurses who live outside the city. Still, there are gaps, so her organization uses telemedicine.“We are constantly on the phone with our patients, triaging, giving medication suggestions, while we are on the way out there,” she said.The living room of Jordan’s home. He began living there with his mother after an accident that eventually cost him his legs. Before his wreck, he helped build out the living room with one of his sons. Jordan waits for his hospice nurse to return with a colostomy bag. He’s been fighting MRSA infections since the 2013 accident and fears the next one will be his last. Hospice isn’t available to everyone who might need itTexas has nearly 500 hospice providers, but 60 percent of its counties do not have a single provider, according to 2015 data — the latest available — compiled by Cordt Kassner, CEO of  Hospice Analytics. Most of those counties are classified as rural by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, but even many of the counties classified as urban are really not — they are one county over from a large town or small city, and the distances are still significant.Use of hospice by eligible patients is only slightly less in rural counties than in urban ones, but Kassner’s data make clear that rural residents enter hospice much later than those living in or near cities: The average length of stay for rural residents is 63 days. For urban residents, it’s 81.Overall, about half the people who are eligible for hospice services in the state actually use them, which is slightly higher than the national average of 46 percent.“Texas, as a whole, in my opinion, has many more hospices than are needed,” said Kassner. There are 254 counties in the state of Texas, and the largest five, by population, have more than 40 percent of the state’s providers. “The distribution of those hospices is not necessarily appropriate.”This is one reason why individual hospices treat people in so many counties, said Larry Farrow, the executive director of the Texas & New Mexico Hospice Organization.“It’s hard. I wish I could say that no matter where you reside in Texas, you have a hospice within 50 miles of you, but it’s not true, and it may never be true,” he said.The lack of nurses and huge areas served by Texas hospices raise possible concerns about the quality of care that people who want to die at home receive. Kaiser Health News recently reported on egregious oversights in hospice care throughout the nation, describing cases that happened in rural parts of the country. In some cases, families called for help at odd hours, and no one came. In another complaint, a provider who showed up was inexperienced, and her calls for backup went unanswered.Hospice experts told STAT that while such situations happen, it’s hard to know how often. In general, most patients and family members who contribute comments to Medicare’s Hospice Compare website seem to be pleased with the quality of care they receive. Tags end of lifenursingpatientslast_img read more

Novartis battles with the Dutch health minister for raising the price of a cancer drug

first_img DOMINICK REUTER/AFP/Getty Images Novartis battles with the Dutch health minister for raising the price of a cancer drug Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Pharmalot What is it? Ed Silverman By Ed Silverman Jan. 14, 2019 Reprints What’s included? About the Author Reprints STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond.center_img Log In | Learn More Unlock this article — plus daily coverage and analysis of the pharma industry — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. Yet another flare-up over the cost of medicines is playing out in the Netherlands, where the government is angry at Novartis (NVS) for boosting the price of a cancer treatment more than six times — to roughly $26,000 for an infusion — in a convoluted case that has spurred debate about orphan drug status and the ability of local hospitals to make their own lower-cost alternatives.At issue is a medication called lutetium octreotate that is used to combat neuroendocrine tumors and was originally developed two decades ago by physicians who were affiliated with the Erasmus Medical Center in Rotterdam. Although they formed a company to secure the rights, the hospital became well known for treating patients with the medicine, including former Apple chief executive Steve Jobs. GET STARTED [email protected] @Pharmalot Tags drug pricingpharmaceuticalsSTAT+last_img read more

Owners of Our Duke gearing up for ‘dream’ day

first_img Community Owners of Our Duke gearing up for ‘dream’ day Home Sport Other Sport Owners of Our Duke gearing up for ‘dream’ day SportOther Sport Twitter Council Laois County Council team up with top chef for online demonstration on tips for reducing food waste WhatsApp The Cooper Family are hoping for success for Our Duke today The owners of Our Duke say that they can’t believe their dreams of having a horse run up the Cheltenham hill are about to come through.Speaking to Midlands 103 live from the Cheltenham Festival this morning, Sloan Cooper says he and the rest of the family are gearing up for a memorable day.He said: “We spent years going to Leopardstown and Fairyhouse watching the likes of Beef Or Salmon and Istabraq.“We always thought it would be great to have a horse like that but we never believed we’d get to Cheltenham. It really is a dream come true.”Looking ahead to the race, which starts at 3.30pm, Sloan reckons any of the 18 runners could win. Facebook Pinterest By Alan Hartnett – 16th March 2018 TAGSCheltenham Gold CupOur Duke center_img Pinterest Previous articleBREAKING: Electric Picnic tickets completely SOLD OUTNext articleTwo changes for Laois hurlers ahead of relegation clash with Antrim Alan HartnettStradbally native Alan Hartnett is a graduate of Knockbeg College who has worked in the local and national media since 2008. Alan has a BA in Economics, Politics and Law and an MA in Journalism from DCU. His happiest moment was when Jody Dillon scored THAT goal in the Laois senior football final in 2016. Ten Laois based players named on Leinster rugby U-18 girls squad Twitter Laois County Council create ‘bigger and better’ disability parking spaces to replace ones occupied for outdoor dining He said: “There are obvious dangers from Native River and Might Bite but any of the 17 horses can win.“We would like the ground a bit better but Our Duke will go on it.“The performance of Presenting Percy which won on Wednesday gave us great confidence as well after Our Duke beat him a few months ago.”While there will be a huge Laois presence in Cheltenham, Sloan also revealed that plans are in place for people to watch the race in Coolrain.Sloan said: “Sheerin’s in Coolrain have a big screen set up and there will be a big crowd there.“They have also made a statue of Our Duke which will go in the Mountrath St Patrick’s Day parade tomorrow.“Lar Hogan is a great man up there and he has it all organised.“If we win, we will hopefully land in there sometime tomorrow evening and we will have some party then.”Another horse with Laois connections, Total Recall, also goes in the race.SEE ALSO – Total Recall aims for Gold Cup glory for Laois priest’s syndicate RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Rugby Facebook WhatsApplast_img read more

REVEALED: Laois manager Sugrue adds two coaches to backroom team for new season

first_img Twitter TAGSJohn SugrueLaois senior footballersSean CotterWilliam Harmon REVEALED: Laois manager Sugrue adds two coaches to backroom team for new season RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Community Pinterest By Alan Hartnett – 16th November 2018 Pinterest Home Sport GAA REVEALED: Laois manager Sugrue adds two coaches to backroom team for new… SportGAAGaelic Football Twitter Laois secondary school announces scholarship winners for new academic year Previous articleLaois movie scoops multiple awards at prestigious film festivalNext articleLaois trio receive UCD awards for exceptional Leaving Cert results Alan HartnettStradbally native Alan Hartnett is a graduate of Knockbeg College who has worked in the local and national media since 2008. Alan has a BA in Economics, Politics and Law and an MA in Journalism from DCU. His happiest moment was when Jody Dillon scored THAT goal in the Laois senior football final in 2016. Charlie Flanagan on Electric Picnic: ‘I’d ask organisers to consult with community leaders’ Laois football manager John Sugrue has filled the void left in his managerial team following the departure of selector Eoin Kearns and coach Jerome Stack last month.Kearns, a former senior championship winner with Ballyroan-Abbey and who was part of the management team that helped the club to a first minor title in almost 50 years last month, has stepped away as a selector due to family committments. But he is remaining on as part of the stats team.Kerry native Stack was previously involved with Laois in 2014 and 2015 alongside Tomas O Flatharta and he also had spells with Limerick and Tipperary.And Sugrue confirmed to LaoisToday that he has turned to within his native Kerry and inside Laois itself to replace the pair.Kerry man William Harmon and Portlaoise’s Sean Cotter will join the backroom team as coaches. Community Cotter was also played senior hurling with Portlaoise and was on the championship winning Portlaoise Junior ‘C’ hurling team this year.Meanwhile, William Harmon will join the Laois side after managing South Kerry who were knocked out of the championship by East Kerry in the quarter final of the championship this year.Originally from the Milltown-Castlemaine clubman is someone who manager Sugrue knows very well.The pair played together for Kerry as minors in 1996 where they actually lost to Laois in the All-Ireland final.Harmon then became part of Sugrue’s management team with South Kerry and, along with current Laois statsman Willie Power, the trio led the team to championship glory.Sugrue stepped away from the role the year after and Harmon took on the role as manager after that.Harmon has been working for Ladies Gaelic Football Association as National Development Officer since 2007 and has been involved in all LGFA development areas throughout his time.For five years prior to that William worked with Kerry GAA as their 3rd Level Games Promotional Officer in IT Tralee.The pair will join sole selector Brendan Delaney from Park-Ratheniska while Strength and Conditioning Coach Robbie Cannon and Bryan Breen from O’Dempsey’s, who played a key role in terms of logistics, will still be involved.Laois’s competitive season will begin with a home O’Byrne Cup game against Meath on December 8 and then they’re away to Wexford on December 15. They complete their O’Byrne Cup group campaign away to Wicklow on January 5.Dublin are automatically into the O’Byrne Cup semi-finals while the remaining Leinster teams are split into groups with three teams emerging to make the last four.Laois then begin their Allianz Football League Division 3 campaign away to Down on Saturday, January 26.The full list of league fixtures are below – but as we now know, Laois will lose home advantage in one of those games for breaching GAA rules regarding training camps. Allianz National Football League Division 3Down v Laois – January 26Laois v Louth – February 2Laois v Sligo – February 10Westmeath v Laois – February 24Laois v Longford – March 2Offaly v Laois – March 16Laois v Carlow – March 24Sean Senior, Sean junior, Paul and Terry Cotter celebrate after Portlaoise winning the Senior Football Final at O’Moore Park in 2008. Picture: Alf HarveyWilliam Harmon during his involvement with the South Kerry footballersSean Cotter in action against Timahoe’s Eoin Culliton in the 2008 Laois SFC FinalSEE ALSO – Introducing the 2018 LaoisToday Minor football Team of the Year Facebook Council WhatsApp Facebook New Arles road opens but disquiet over who was invited to official opening Cotter would have been involved with Laois minor and U-21 football teams during his playing career and has minor, U-21 and senior football medals with Portlaoise as well as being involved with teams that won the Leinster club championship.He has been involved a lot with NUI Maynooth. Cotter was part of management under John Divilly that helped Maynooth to a rare Sigerson Cup final appearance in 2012 and later became the manager.He then linked up with Malachy McNulty last year and has been a selector with Portlaoise for their two championship wins in 2017 and 2018. WhatsApplast_img read more

Elections for People’s Committees across North Korea scheduled for July

first_img News Elections for People’s Committees across North Korea scheduled for July US dollar and Chinese reminbi plummet against North Korean won once again SHARE NewsEconomy News People's Committee elections in 2015People’s Committee elections in 2015. Image: DPRK TodayOn the heels of elections to the country’s rubber-stamp parliament, North Korea’s provincial People’s Committees will see their own elections this July, sources inside the country report.This year, the provincial People’s Committee elections will follow the nationwide elections to North Korea’s rubber-stamp Supreme People’s Assembly (SPA). They are the second such event to occur since Kim Jong Un came to power, the first being held in July 2015.“At county Party Committee meetings for officials, they announced that the People’s Committee elections will take place in July,” a source in North Pyongan Province told Daily NK on March 25.A source in Hyesan, Ryanggang Province corroborated this news, noting that he had been informed that the event will be held in mid-July.In the past, North Korean state media has typically announced plans for provincial People’s Committee elections one to two months out from their commencement.Elections in North Korea are neither free nor fair. According to defectors, those appointed as People’s Committee delegates are deemed to have shown loyalty to the local Party Committee and higher-ups and are most often a combination of intellectuals, farmers, and laborers. Mirroring the Supreme People’s Assembly elections, candidates run unopposed and are preselected by the Workers’ Party.Voting is mandatory and voting against a candidate is considered an act of treason.“Law enforcement bodies have been ordered to sustain heightened surveillance over the movement of residents and activities that began ahead of the SPA election through the local People’s Committee elections,” a separate source in North Pyongan Province reported.That the restrictions have hampered the movement of goods through the country’s markets and prompted food prices to rise recently is grim news for the many North Koreans struggling to make ends meet. By Kim Yoo Jin – 2019.03.28 1:36pm center_img News AvatarKim Yoo JinKim Yoo Jin is one of Daily NK’s freelance journalists. Please direct any questions about his articles to [email protected] North Korea Market Price Update: June 8, 2021 (Rice and USD Exchange Rate Only) Facebook Twitter Proposal to shift “general markets” to “specialized markets” finds little support among N. Korean leaders RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORlast_img read more

Mercedes-AMG is killing off its twin-turbo V12 engine

We encourage all readers to share their views on our articles using Facebook commenting Visit our FAQ page for more information. Mercedes-AMG is killing the beloved bi-turbo V12 in favour of hybrid V8 power.The automaker will axe the 6.0-litre V12 when the vehicles currently using it finish their life cycle, CEO Tobias Moers told GoAuto.com during the 2018 Paris auto show.This means the current S65 sedan, coupe, and cabriolet will be the last of the V12 breed, and the S65 nameplate will disappear along with it. advertisement Buy It! Princess Diana’s humble little 1981 Ford Escort is up for auction An engagement gift from Prince Charles, the car is being sold by a Princess Di “superfan” PlayThe Rolls-Royce Boat Tail may be the most expensive new car everPlay3 common new car problems (and how to prevent them) | Maintenance Advice | Driving.caPlayFinal 5 Minivan Contenders | Driving.caPlay2021 Volvo XC90 Recharge | Ministry of Interior Affairs | Driving.caPlayThe 2022 Ford F-150 Lightning is a new take on Canada’s fave truck | Driving.caPlayBuying a used Toyota Tundra? Check these 5 things first | Used Truck Advice | Driving.caPlayCanada’s most efficient trucks in 2021 | Driving.caPlay3 ways to make night driving safer and more comfortable | Advice | Driving.caPlayDriving into the Future: Sustainability and Innovation in tomorrow’s cars | Driving.ca virtual panelPlayThese spy shots get us an early glimpse of some future models | Driving.ca Trending in Canada Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.2 Mercedes-AMG SL 65, Brilliantblau, V12-Biturbomotor, 463 kW (630 PS), 1000 Nm RELATED TAGSMercedes-AMGLuxuryLuxury VehiclesNew Vehicles ‹ Previous Next › Trending Videos COMMENTSSHARE YOUR THOUGHTS In order to keep up with the times, Mercedes-AMG will be extending the life of its relatively young 4.0-litre V8, and they’ll do this by adding hybrid technology to the mix.The first vehicle likely to sport this powertrain will be the Mercedes-AMG GT four-door we should see in 2020, with electric motors helping to bring the power up to around 800 horsepower in that application.“In combination with an electrified powertrain, it could be a longer life cycle than what everybody thinks,” says Moers. “The V8 is a pretty efficient engine,” referring to its being downsized from 6.3 to 5.5 to 4.0 litres.A few months ago, Mercedes board member Ola Källenius said the V12 would be around for the “foreseeable future,” and that “we have no plans to give up on it.” Maybe Mercedes weren’t wearing their glasses at that point in time.Moers also said he doesn’t know when they’ll be discontinuing the V8. “Nobody in the industry is able to predict when the V8 engine ends,” he noted, adding that its demise is nevertheless inevitable. AMG will eventually be making all-electric cars, he said, because “otherwise there will not be an AMG”. The Rolls-Royce Boat Tail may be the most expensive new car ever See More Videos read more

New sex abuse charges against former USC campus gynecologist

first_imgHomeBad BehaviorNew sex abuse charges against former USC campus gynecologist Jul. 10, 2020 at 5:00 amBad BehaviorBriefsCrimeNew sex abuse charges against former USC campus gynecologistGuest Author11 months agoDr. George Tyndallsex abuseUSC gynecologist New charges have been filed against a former University of Southern California campus gynecologist accused of sexually assaulting young women who were his patients, Los Angeles County District Attorney Jackie Lacey said Thursday.The additional charges involve five new alleged victims of Dr. George Tyndall, who has previously pleaded not guilty to criminal charges involving 16 women.The amended complaint adds five counts of sexual penetration of an unconscious person and one count of sexual battery by fraud that allegedly occurred while Tyndall, 73, worked at a USC health center between 2011 and 2015.Arraignment was scheduled for July 24. An email seeking comment on the new allegations was sent to the office of Tyndall’s defense attorney, Leonard Levine. Tyndall was initially charged in June 2019 with 18 counts of sexual penetration of an unconscious person and 11 counts of sexual battery by fraud, all felonies.All 21 victims went to the campus facility for annual exams or for other treatment dating back to 2009, prosecutors said.Tyndall resigned in 2017 and allegations against him became public in 2018 through a Los Angeles Times investigation.If convicted as charged, Tyndall now faces a possible maximum sentence of 64 years in state prison.In February, the U.S. Department of Education said it found systemic failures in USC’s treatment of allegations of sexual abuse by Tyndall and ordered the school to overhaul its procedures for preventing sex discrimination and to conduct a formal review of how employees responded. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos called it a “total and complete failure to protect students.”USC’s new president, Carol L. Folt, pledged to protect the safety of students, faculty and staff and to restore trust in the university.A federal judge has approved a $215 million class-action settlement between USC and about 18,000 women who saw Tyndall at the university. Payments would range from $2,500 to $250,000, with specific sums decided by a panel of experts. Hundreds of women have opted out of the federal court settlement and many are pursuing separate lawsuits in state court. JOHN ANTCZAK, Associated PressTags :Dr. George Tyndallsex abuseUSC gynecologistshare on Facebookshare on Twitteradd a commentLatino group launches $10M campaign to boost voter turnoutLaughing Matters – Second Banana, First Class MenschYou Might Also LikeBriefsLos Angeles Sheriff’s deputy accused of destroying evidence of 2019 assaultAssociated Press10 hours agoBriefsCalifornia State Treasurer Fiona Ma to Speak at Online Santa Monica College Commencement Ceremony June 25Guest Author10 hours agoBriefsNewsBeach House Begins Community Re-Opening June 15Guest Author1 day agoBriefsNewsInput Invited for Marine Park Improvement ProjectsGuest Author1 day agoBriefsNewsPublic Health Emphasizes the Importance of Vaccinations as Distancing and Masking Guidelines Relax Next WeekGuest Author1 day agoBriefsNews“Righting Our Wrongs” performance on June 11Guest Author1 day agolast_img read more